Digital Communities and Collaboration: Finding, Sharing, and Creating Online Resources with Rebecca Oliva | Recording to follow

Rebecca Olivia

 

Digital Communities and Collaboration: Finding, Sharing, and Creating Online Resources with Rebecca Oliva | 2 April 2021 | 11:00 - 12:30 | Free to attend

In the final part of our Catalytic Lecture series, Rebecca will look into the meaning of open source in terms of computing including how to share work digitally and the recycling, modification and interaction with work we see online.

Exploring the pros and cons of distributing work using online tools, Rebecca will discuss topics such as donations, social media and ownership as well as understanding who has the right to share your work from beyond the original source.

Rebecca has kindly shared the PowerPoint that she presented as part of her lecture. Please note that the information in this presentation was correct at the time of the event:

Digital Communities and Collaboration PowerPoint

 

The Catalytic Lecture series will welcome world renowned speakers to explore the three aspects of ownership that dance artists have to navigate when creating work: copyright and intellectual property, shared ownership in collaboration, and open-source content. Each of the three sessions will be delivered on Zoom and will provide space for information and discussion - we look forward to welcoming you along!

Lecturer Bio:

Rebecca Oliva is a librarian and performing artist who lives and works in Glasgow. She trained to be a librarian at the Glasgow School of Art, before studying for an MSc in Library and Information Studies at the University of Strathclyde. In a previous role as the Head Librarian at the Scottish Poetry Library, her focus included working on the redevelopment of the library’s website. Her current role involves facilitating learning and teaching remotely using digital tools and technologies.

 

 

 

Supported by Creative Scotland with funding from Scottish Government.

 

Creative Scotland
Supported by Edinburgh
Supported by the City of Edinburgh Council